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Ike

This is a real tweet from the president of the United States

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Our military told the Kurds in Syria that they needed to remove defensive fortifications along their border territory with Turkey.

 

American forces were trying to broker a deal with both Turkey and the Kurds that if they created a 20 mile buffer zone, and both sides removed their defensive fortifications, then that would prevent conflict and the Kurds would be relatively safe.

 

So the Kurds complied and removed their heavy weapons and fortification and pulled back 20 miles away from their border.

 

3AFRKMSIWJBBZBNXVX3ZXEXX5Y.jpg

 

.......and we just fucked them, basically said "alright, see ya" and are leaving with absolutely nothing there along that buffer zone.

 

And now the Turkish armed forces are getting into that territory, and can now reach entire Kurdish towns.

 

This immediately benefits Erdrogan, which in turn, immediately benefits Putin.  Now the Kurds are being squeezed in between Turkish forces and Bashir Al-Assad's Syrian government.  The Kurds are the ones who fought ISIS for us in this region. Where Trump takes credit for "eliminating ISIS".  This is the thanks the Kurds get.

 

Oh, by the way, if Kurds begin to get slaughtered because of this in Syria, what do you think the Kurds in Northern Iraq are going to start doing? We're creating another anti-American faction in the middle-East, that's how ridiculous this is.

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1 minute ago, Hot Sauce said:

PeNcE wOuLd bE woRsE :grimaceright:

Saw your post in the politics thread. :happysad:

 

This shit is old news. :|

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1 minute ago, Ike said:

Saw your post in the politics thread. :happysad:

 

This shit is old news. :|

It deserves it's own thread. That tweet is just so repugnant and a perfect microcosm of what make's Trump so unfit to be president.

  • Upvote 3

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9 minutes ago, jehurey said:

Our military told the Kurds in Syria that they needed to remove defensive fortifications along their border territory with Turkey.

 

American forces were trying to broker a deal with both Turkey and the Kurds that if they created a 20 mile buffer zone, and both sides removed their defensive fortifications, then that would prevent conflict and the Kurds would be relatively safe.

 

So the Kurds complied and removed their heavy weapons and fortification and pulled back 20 miles away from their border.

 

 

 

.......and we just fucked them, basically said "alright, see ya" and are leaving with absolutely nothing there along that buffer zone.

 

And now the Turkish armed forces are getting into that territory, and can now reach entire Kurdish towns.

 

This immediately benefits Erdrogan, which in turn, immediately benefits Putin.  Now the Kurds are being squeezed in between Turkish forces and Bashir Al-Assad's Syrian government.  The Kurds are the ones who fought ISIS for us in this region. Where Trump takes credit for "eliminating ISIS".  This is the thanks the Kurds get.

 

Oh, by the way, if Kurds begin to get slaughtered because of this in Syria, what do you think the Kurds in Northern Iraq are going to start doing? We're creating another anti-American faction in the middle-East, that's how ridiculous this is.

So Trump is helping out his dictator buddies? *surprised Pikachu face*

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I think Putin is forcing Trump to make these moves because he's cashing in his chips now since time is of the essence.

 

Quote

Donald Trump has weathered storm after storm throughout his presidency, emerging virtually unscathed from controversies and disasters thanks to a Republican firewall that has so far wholly insulated him from consequences. But new polling suggests that his support may be cracking amid the Ukraine scandal that has engulfed his presidency and sent him on a path toward impeachment. A Washington Post/Schar School poll released Tuesday found that public opinion is dramatically shifting in favor of the fast-moving impeachment inquiry Democrats launched in response to Trump’s attempt to get Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden. Fifty-eight percent of Americans surveyed said they support the probe, and close to half of respondents backed Trump’s removal from office. More troubling for Trump, nearly 30 percent of Republicans polled said they support the inquiry, and close to a fifth of registered GOP voters say he should be removed.

30 percent of Republicans saying they support an impeachment inquiry.

 

And two-thirds of that 30 percent are basically saying "impeachment him AND remove him."

 

That is a considerable amount of Republicans. That must mean that Independents must be leaning towards Impeachment and Removal as well.

 

The more bombshells we keep seeing, the more whistleblowers that keep coming out, and the more he melts down in noticeable ways...........those numbers are going up.

 

When the House impeaches him, the process is clearly not over. But in every newspaper in America, it will say "Trump Impeached" in three-inch huge letters.  Internally, Republicans are saying that Mitt Romney needs to primary him, but that Romney is thinking about getting him removed before he enters the race.

 

The walls are closing in for Ole Donnie.

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Retired General Joseph Votel used to be the head of United States Central Command, which basically means he was one of the most power military commanders that oversaw all operation in the Middle East.

 

He wrote an editorial in The Atlantic yesterday. Its very rare for any general, even retired, to start making public opinions on current foreign policy.

 

But the Trump decision on Syria shocked him so much that he decided to speak up:

 

 

Quote

 

The Danger of Abandoning Our Partners

The Syria policy reversal threatens to undo five years’ worth of fighting against ISIS and will severely damage American credibility and reliability.

Joseph Votel and Elizabeth Dent

Oct 8, 2019

 

The abrupt policy decision to seemingly abandon our Kurdish partners could not come at a worse time. The decision was made without consulting U.S. allies or senior U.S. military leadership and threatens to affect future partnerships at precisely the time we need them most, given the war-weariness of the American public coupled with ever more sophisticated enemies determined to come after us.

 

In northeastern Syria, we had one of the most successful partnerships. The Islamic State was using Syria as a sanctuary to support its operations in Iraq and globally, including by hosting and training foreign fighters. We had to go after ISIS quickly and effectively. The answer came in the form of a small band of Kurdish forces pinned up against the Turkish border and fighting for their lives against ISIS militants in the Syrian town of Kobane in 2014.

 

We had tried many other options first. The U.S. initially worked to partner with moderate Syrian rebel groups, investing $500 million in a train-and-equip program to build their capabilities to fight against ISIS in Syria. That endeavor failed, save for a small force in southeastern Syria near the American al-Tanf base, which began as a U.S. outpost to fight ISIS and remains today as a deterrent against Iran. So we turned to Turkey to identify alternative groups, but the Pentagon found that the force Turkey had trained was simply inadequate and would require tens of thousands of U.S. troops to bolster it in battle. With no public appetite for a full-scale U.S. ground invasion, we were forced to look elsewhere.

I (Joseph Votel) first met General Mazloum Abdi at a base in northern Syria in May 2016. From the start, it was obvious he was not only an impressive and thoughtful man, but a fighter who was clearly thinking about the strategic aspects of the campaign against ISIS and aware of the challenges of fighting a formidable enemy. He could see the long-term perils from the civil war, but recognized that the most immediate threat to his people was ISIS. After a fitful start in Syria, I concluded that we had finally found the right partner who could help us defeat ISIS without getting drawn into the murkier conflict against Bashar al-Assad’s regime.

 

The Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), initially composed of the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG), was then conceived: a fighting force that eventually grew to 60,000 battle-hardened and determined soldiers. The decision to partner with the YPG, beginning with the fight in Kobane, was made across two administrations and had required years of deliberation and planning, especially given the concerns of our NATO ally Turkey, who regards the SDF as an offshoot of the designated terrorist group the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK). Eventually, the YPG became the backbone of the fighting force against ISIS in Syria. Without it, President Donald Trump could not have declared the complete defeat of ISIS.

 

With support from what grew to be the 80-member Coalition to Defeat ISIS, which included air power, advisers on the ground, and equipment, the SDF became a force to be reckoned with and led a string of victories. In August 2016, it liberated the Syrian town of Manbij, which once functioned as a hub for ISIS fighters to cross into Turkey and is believed to be where the attackers who carried out the November 2015 Paris attacks transited. Mindful of the need for credibility as it pushed to liberate Arab-dominated areas, the YPG had succeeded in incorporating Arab units into its structure as a united Arab-Kurd fighting force. That force, the SDF, went on to liberate the so-called capital of the caliphate, Raqqa, and towns in the Middle Euphrates River Valley, culminating in the territorial defeat of ISIS in Baghouz this past March.

 

Over four years, the SDF freed tens of thousands of square miles and millions of people from the grip of ISIS. Throughout the fight, it sustained nearly 11,000 casualties. By comparison, six U.S. service members, as well as two civilians, have been killed in the anti-ISIS campaign. Key to this effective relationship was mutual trust, constant communication, and clear expectations. The partnership was not without its difficulties. That included working through the December 2018 announcement of our sudden departure and our subsequent agreement with Turkey to pursue a security mechanism for the border areas. But each time, the strong mutual trust built on the ground between our military members and the SDF preserved our momentum. The sudden policy change this week breaks that trust at the most crucial juncture and leaves our partners with very limited options.

 

It didn’t have to be this way. The U.S. worked endlessly to placate our Turkish allies.

We engaged in countless rounds of negotiations, committing to establishing a security mechanism that included joint patrols in areas of concern to the Turks, and deploying 150 additional U.S. troops to help monitor and enforce the “safe zone.” Yet Ankara repeatedly reneged on its agreements with the U.S., deeming them inadequate and threatening to invade SDF-held areas, despite the presence of U.S. soldiers.

 

A possible invasion from Turkey against the Kurdish elements of the SDF, coupled with a hasty U.S. departure, now threaten to rapidly destabilize an already fragile security situation in Syria’s northeast, where ISIS’s physical caliphate was only recently defeated. Nearly 2,000 foreign fighters, about 9,000 Iraqi and Syrian fighters, and tens of thousands of ISIS family members are being held in detention facilities and displaced-persons camps in areas under SDF control. What happens if we leave? The SDF has already stated that it will have to fortify defense mechanisms along the Syrian-Turkish border, leaving ISIS detention facilities and encampments with little to no security. This is particularly troubling, given that Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, the self-proclaimed caliph of ISIS, recently called on supporters to break fighters out of these facilities. There have also been violent attacks in the al-Hol refugee camp, where tens of thousands of women and children are housed and where ISIS sympathy runs rampant.

 

The Pentagon and White House later clarified that the U.S. was not abandoning the Kurds and did not support a Turkish incursion into Syria. But the damage may already be done, because it appears the Turks have taken the shift to signal a green light for an attack in the northeast. This policy abandonment threatens to undo five years’ worth of fighting against ISIS and will severely damage American credibility and reliability in any future fights where we need strong allies.

 
 
General Joseph Votel served as commander of U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) from March 2016 to March 2019. As commander of CENTCOM, Votel oversaw military operations across the region, including the campaign against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Before CENTCOM, he was the commander of the U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) and the Joint Special Operations Command (JSOC). General Votel is a non-resident Distinguished Senior Fellow on National Security at the Middle East Institute (MEI).

 

There were only 50 American soldiers that were with the Syrian forces at the border, and those 50 American soldiers, who were there for training and planning, were the ONLY reason why Turkish forces were not storming the border.
 
Those 50 soldiers knew that if they leave, the people they were leaving behind were going to slaughtered by the second biggest army that is in NATO.

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Quote

 

800.jpeg
 

AKCAKALE, Turkey (AP) — Turkey pressed its air and ground assault against U.S.-allied Kurdish forces in northern Syria on Thursday for a second day, pounding the region with airstrikes and an artillery bombardment that raised columns of black smoke in a border town and sent panicked civilians scrambling to get out.

Amid the fierce fighting, residents fled with their belongings loaded into cars, pickup trucks and motorcycle rickshaws, while others escaped on foot. The U.N. refugee agency said tens of thousands were on the move, and aid agencies warned that nearly a half-million people near the border were at risk.

It was a wrenchingly familiar scene for many who had fled the militants of the Islamic State group only a few years ago.

There were casualties on both sides: Turkish officials in two border provinces said mortar fire from Syria killed at least six civilians, including a 9-month-old boy and three girls under 15. On the Syrian side, seven civilians and eight Kurdish fighters have been killed since the operation began, according to activists in Syria.

The Turkish offensive was launched three days after U.S. President Donald Trump opened the way by pulling American troops from their positions near the border alongside their Kurdish allies.

 

It is estimated that 30,000 Kurds have been sent fleeing within the first 24 hours, and they expect that number to grow rapidly.

There were 50 American troops that were strategically placed at the northern Syrian border in order to prevent all of this from happening.

Edrogan is planning for a genocide, with air support from Russia. It is also rumored that Edrogan is going to work with Bashir Al-Assad to both go after the Kurds, essentially trapping them on both sides.

Where are all the "we must get out, no matter what" people at?????? @Cookester15 @Vini?????????????????????

 

Take a look at that photo. I can only imagine the excuses you're writing down right now.

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8 minutes ago, jehurey said:
 

It is estimated that 30,000 Kurds have been sent fleeing within the first 24 hours, and they expect that number to grow rapidly.

There were 50 American troops that were strategically placed at the northern Syrian border in order to prevent all of this from happening.

Edrogan is planning for a genocide, with air support from Russia. It is also rumored that Edrogan is going to work with Bashir Al-Assad to both go after the Kurds, essentially trapping them on both sides.

Where are all the "we must get out, no matter what" people at?????? @Cookester15 @Vini?????????????????????

 

Take a look at that photo. I can only imagine the excuses you're writing down right now.

Why would I make excuses for this?

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Just now, Cookester15 said:

Why would I make excuses for this?

because this is your ideology being implemented.

 

No questions............no analysis............we pull the troops out without any thought.

 

That is, 100%, your position. And whatsherface.

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3 minutes ago, jehurey said:

because this is your ideology being implemented.

 

No questions............no analysis............we pull the troops out without any thought.

 

That is, 100%, your position. And whatsherface.

Even tulsi critisized this you tool

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Just now, Cookester15 said:

Even tulsi critisized this you tool

This IS your ideology, correct?

 

"Pull out the troops...............NO QUESTIONS............pull them out, full-stop."

 

Correct?

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1 minute ago, jehurey said:

This IS your ideology, correct?

 

"Pull out the troops...............NO QUESTIONS............pull them out, full-stop."

 

Correct?

Who said no questioned asked?

 

Stop making shit up.

 

Im against starting regime change wars, but if we are already involved in one and people will die because we leave then we must stay until we fix it.

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1 minute ago, Cookester15 said:

Who said no questioned asked?

 

Stop making shit up.

 

Im against starting regime change wars, but if we are already involved in one and people will die because we leave then we must stay until we fix it.

Nope................you said FULL PULLOUT of American forces.

 

We even tried to explain to you why it makes sense to have a presence in certain countries........and you weren't having ANY OF IT.

 

Full removal of troops.

 

You are changing your position right now.............you have NEVER typed what you just typed in your last sentence.

 

WE are the ones who LECTURED you that if we remove US troops in certain area, people die. WE TOLD YOU THAT.

Edited by jehurey

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22 minutes ago, jehurey said:

Nope................you said FULL PULLOUT of American forces.

 

We even tried to explain to you why it makes sense to have a presence in certain countries........and you weren't having ANY OF IT.

 

Full removal of troops.

 

You are changing your position right now.............you have NEVER typed what you just typed in your last sentence.

 

WE are the ones who LECTURED you that if we remove US troops in certain area, people die. WE TOLD YOU THAT.

stop making shit up

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1 minute ago, Cookester15 said:

stop making shit up

If you had provided ANY NUANCE to your position, we would've heard it.

 

You can't find a single quote defending your newfound SHIFT, can you?

 

Your position was always very simple: Pull out of the middle east. Period.

 

Little too late to try and sneak in some retconning.

 

We literally LECTURED YOU about why we need to have some presence.

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4 minutes ago, jehurey said:

If you had provided ANY NUANCE to your position, we would've heard it.

 

You can't find a single quote defending your newfound SHIFT, can you?

 

Your position was always very simple: Pull out of the middle east. Period.

 

Little too late to try and sneak in some retconning.

 

We literally LECTURED YOU about why we need to have some presence.

Yes because being team america world police has worked out so well right? How many died in Iraq? A million?  Nice job guys.  *clap clap clap* 

 

How many died in Afghanistan?  

 

Nowhere have I said we should abandon Syria.  Its too late for that, damage done. Now fucking fix it. 

 

 

 

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1 minute ago, Cookester15 said:

Yes because being team america world police has worked out so well right? How many died in Iraq? A million?  Nice job guys.  *clap clap clap* 

 

How many died in Afghanistan?  

 

Nowhere have I said we should abandon Syria.  Its too late for that, damage done. Now fucking fix it. 

 

 

 

Same applies to Afghanistan. if we leave, people die, and ISIS returns (along with the Taliban regime regaining their strength and taking over the country).

 

SAME exact consequences.

 

But you "PULL OUT TROOPS. COMPLETELY. " There is no shade of gray to your position. It was absolute.

 

Trying to use semnatics isn't going to help "well..........we never talked about syria, specifically"  Sorry, that ain't working.

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1 minute ago, jehurey said:

Same applies to Afghanistan. if we leave, people die, and ISIS returns (along with the Taliban regime regaining their strength and taking over the country).

 

SAME exact consequences.

 

But you "PULL OUT TROOPS. COMPLETELY. " There is no shade of gray to your position. It was absolute.

 

Trying to use semnatics isn't going to help "well..........we never talked about syria, specifically"  Sorry, that ain't working.

I said I'm against regime change wars. Do you ever stop to think these enemies exist because we create them?  

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