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Google Stadia will be “faster and more responsive” than local gaming hardware

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1 minute ago, lynux3 said:

Did you fall off your rocker today? I'm surprised you're trying to argue against something seemingly obvious. It's funny how everyone but you don't think this is Google's version of multi-GPU rendering, aka, CFX/SLI.

 

The most obvious difference is in the cloud, but who cares? The technology is the same as if it were applied locally at a smaller scale. Even the company who partnered with Google says its multi-GPU rendering. You're saying they're wrong? :cosby2:

No bro.  Just listen...  I know what SLI and Crossfire are.  They're a type of interface used to connect multiple GPUs together.  Each GPU in these cases does the same amount of work and is displayed in an Alternate Frame rendering mode, or a Split mode.  Each GPU renders an alternate frame and so on.  Each GPU must be used equally, or the primary GPU will stall until the 2nd GPU can finish it's frame.

 

Stadia will do something different.  It's already shown a tech demo showcasing something that SLI/Crossfire can't do.... One GPU rendering specific parts of the scene and the other GPU rendering other parts.  They are combining elements in the scene... not complete frames rendered on alternating GPUs.

 

Quote

Building the future with multi-GPU technology
Multi-GPU computing has the potential to make game experiences richer and more dynamic. But PCs with multiple GPUs are rare and expensive, which gives game developers little reason to explore the opportunities.

 

Stadia makes multi-GPU systems available to everyone through the cloud. It gives game developers the tools to push in-game graphics to new levels.

For the last few months, we've been working with Google to create a real-time demo of cloud-based, multi-GPU rendering to show how games might use the extra performance available through Stadia.

 

In our demo, one GPU handles most of the traditional geometry rendering. Additional GPUs are called in as needed to enhance the scene with dynamic fluid simulations and complex particle effects.

 

That CANNOT be done with SLI/Crossfire.... BECAUSEEEEEEE the GPUs cannot access and read/write to each others memory..

 

If you want to simplify what they're doing as SLI/Crossfire... then fine... but it's not that.  The connection is not crossfire/SLI... the support will already be built into their API.. they will have far more control over it than any PC user would have with Crossfire or SLI.

 

Now that's all I'ma say.  It's snowing like a bitch outside (I love it) and my wifes got some stew cooking for supper tonight :lawd: 

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29 minutes ago, -GD- said:

i should have premium performance

Screen Shot 2019-10-11 at 6.23.37 PM.png

2ms latency... :deader: 

 

Just tested mine..

 

testspeed.png

 

I'm happy with it though.  I download games at about 20MB/s.  Fast enough.

Edited by Remij_

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13 minutes ago, Remij_ said:

No bro.  Just listen...  I know what SLI and Crossfire are.  They're a type of interface used to connect multiple GPUs together.  Each GPU in these cases does the same amount of work and is displayed in an Alternate Frame rendering mode, or a Split mode.  Each GPU renders an alternate frame and so on.  Each GPU must be used equally, or the primary GPU will stall until the 2nd GPU can finish it's frame.

 

Stadia will do something different.  It's already shown a tech demo showcasing something that SLI/Crossfire can't do.... One GPU rendering specific parts of the scene and the other GPU rendering other parts.  They are combining elements in the scene... not complete frames rendered on alternating GPUs.

 

 

That CANNOT be done with SLI/Crossfire.... BECAUSEEEEEEE the GPUs cannot access and read/write to each others memory..

 

If you want to simplify what they're doing as SLI/Crossfire... then fine... but it's not that.  The connection is not crossfire/SLI... the support will already be built into their API.. they will have far more control over it than any PC user would have with Crossfire or SLI.

 

Now that's all I'ma say.  It's snowing like a bitch outside (I love it) and my wifes got some stew cooking for supper tonight :lawd: 

Enjoy your stew, but you missed a key note. "In our demo, one GPU handles most of the traditional geometry rendering."

 

That suggests there is multi GPU rendering akin to CFX/SLI with basically something similar to having a dedicated PhysX card. Google's version of all of this is just an evolution of a pretty much dead technology. 

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