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Doesn't the EU have to approve the extension as well?

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10 minutes ago, jehurey said:

Can a general election and a referendum vote be had at the same time, or must those be two separate things?

A referendum could (perhaps @Angelfish can correct me on this) be called, but no one is really proposing that due to the potential backlash from the Vote Leave constituents; and by that I mean there are individual members of parliament who would like another referendum (and they'll argue it for various reasons), but the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn has stated he believes that their only move is a negotiated agreement with the EU for a Brexit. 

 

But a general election can either be called by the party in power, as with a referendum, but neither seem people since Boris seems to have pissed off enough people within his own party: by sacking of assistants, threats of expulsion from the party, and an overall sense that he really has no clue on how to proceed or even get to October 31st, the supposed Hard Brexit date.

 

Also, @Ike yes I believe the EU would need to offer the UK an extension to avoid crashing out completely on the current date.

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This is Boris' current position: Let the Labour Party/Corbyn, along with the Scottish national party, and tory rebels vote for a Fresh election. The ultimate wildcard here (like Charlie from It's Always Sunny, wildcard) is Nigel Farage and that Brexit party of his.

 

 

His Brexit party could siphon votes from Conservative ridings, especially in the north and midlands of the country (where Vote Leave was the strongest) and where dissatisfaction for the stalling and political ineptitude is palpable, and this could then lead to the almost non-existent Lib-Dem party getting even more votes (I think prior to Theresa May's last election call, they were down to 3 or 4 seats in Parliament...) and thus potentially putting Boris Johnson with an even smaller minority - all backed by the idea that a coalition couldn't be formed since the idea of Jeremy Corbyn as Prime Minister would never sit right with so many different parties involved; so yeah should be a fun next few days!

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Oh and right on queue, they're expelling members of the Conservative party.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by Teh_Diplomat

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:D They added a Sharpie to continue the Trump tale that the hurricane was headed for Alabama...

 

 

 

 

 

GettyImages-1172258193_jwkqvj

 

 

Edited by Teh_Diplomat

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Jesus fuck British politics is a mess right now...

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Quote

 

Biden, Sanders and Warren lead Trump in new Texas poll

By Jonathan Easley - 09/10/19 01:51 PM EDT
 

The top three contenders for the Democratic presidential nomination all lead President Trump in deep-red Texas where a Democrat has not won a statewide race in 25 years, according to a new poll.

 

The latest Univision News survey of Texas finds Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders (I) doing best in a hypothetical head-to-head match-up against Trump in Texas, leading the president 48 percent to 42 percent.

 

Former Vice President Joe Biden leads Trump 47 percent to 43 percent, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has a narrow 44 percent to 42 percent advantage.

 

The Univision survey found that 40 percent of registered voters in Texas would cast a ballot for an unnamed Democrat, while 33 percent said they’d vote for Trump. When undecided voters leaning one way or the other are factored in, the Democrat leads Trump 47 percent to 42 percent.

 

The poll is the latest one to find Democrats running close to Trump or leading him in Texas, which has not gone for the Democratic presidential contender in more than 40 years.

 

Two other polls conducted this year have found Biden edging Trump in the Lone Star State.

 

Many Republicans believe predictions that Texas will go blue in 2020 are overblown, although they acknowledge the GOP must do more to reach suburban voters, women, young people and racial minorities in the rapidly changing state.

 

giphy.gif

 

 

 

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So this happened this morning at North Carolina's state legislature.

 

They have a Senate and a House legislature. The Republicans had tried to pass a budget bill that would block healthcare for about 500,000 people in that state.

 

The North Carolina governor, who is a Democrat, vetoed the bill. The Republicans don't enough people to override his veto.

 

This would mean that the Republicans have no choice but to find a compromise with the Democratic members of the NC state legislature to create a budget bill that the governor is willing to sign into law.

 

So what do the North Carolina Republicans do?

 

They tell the Democrats that they will not try to pass any laws in the NC House session this morning while there are 9/11 memorial ceremonies.

 

A good chunk of Democrats go to attend the ceremony for remember 9/11.

 

The North Carolina Republicans then go against their word and ram through an override vote with the remaining people that stayed behind, thereby achieving a 2/3's majority because they took advantage of Democrats leaving the House to go to a 9/11 ceremony.

 

They straight-up lied and cheated.

 

 

Quote

 

NC House Republicans override Gov. Cooper’s budget veto while he’s at 9/11 memorial event

 

by: CBS 17 Digital Desk

Posted: Sep 11, 2019 / 09:20 AM EDT / Updated: Sep 11, 2019 / 01:22 PM EDT

 

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) — North Carolina House Republicans called a surprise vote and overrode Gov. Roy Cooper’s budget veto on Wednesday morning, Cooper said at a press conference Wednesday afternoon.

 

The vote was taken while Cooper was at a 9/11 memorial event.

 

According to a tweet by State Sen. Jeff Jackson (D-Mecklenburg), almost half of the House members were absent when the vote was taken, which resulted in a 55-9 tally.

 

Jackson said Democrats were specifically told by Republicans that no votes would be held in Wednesday’s morning session.

The veto still stands in the Senate.

 

“Plainly unethical behavior by Republicans today,” the senator said in his tweet. “There have to be consequences for this kind of behavior. Just another lesson in why they must lose their majority.”

 

Cooper had an event scheduled in Scotland County Wednesday morning, but he canceled it and instead held a press conference at 12 p.m. regarding the vote.

 

“For two months, Republicans refused to offer a compromise or sit down at a true negotiating table with me,” he said. “Democrats were told there would be no votes this morning. That was a bald-faced lie.”

 

Cooper was forceful with his language when describing what happened at the General Assembly.

 

“Today, Republicans waged an assault on our democracy,” Cooper said. “They cheated the people of North Carolina.”

 

In a question-and-answer session with reporters at the press conference, Cooper said he had never seen anything like what happened Wednesday morning.

 

“I have never seen anything like this in my 30-plus years in state government,” he said. “This is a true assault on our democracy. There is no question about it.”

 

House Speaker Tim Moore said during a press conference around 1:15 p.m. he has made it clear he was looking for any opportunity to override the budget veto.

 

Moore said he took exception to the attacks made by Cooper and other Democrats Wednesday morning following the vote.

“It was properly noticed,” Moore said. “It’s a great day for North Carolina.”

 

Moore said it is his job as house speaker to see the budget that was passed by majority become law.

“All they had to do was show up to work,” Moore said in regards to Democrats.

 

Rep. John Autry (D-Mecklenburg) posted a video from the floor of the General Assembly showing Rep. Deb Butler (D-Brunswick, New Hanover) voicing her displeasure after finding out about the veto override.

 

In the video, Butler called the Speaker of the House “a coward” and said, “you are making a mockery of this process. You are deceiving the people of North Carolina. Your leadership is an embarrassment to the history of this great state.

 

The video can be seen in its entirety above.

 

Another video, recorded by Suzanne Weiss, a legislative assistant to Rep. Wesley Harris’ (D-Mecklenburg), showed members of the House surrounding Butler to prevent her from being arrested.

https://www.cbs17.com/news/north-carolina-news/nc-house-republicans-overrode-gov-coopers-budget-veto-while-he-attended-9-11-memorial-event/

 

Both sides are not the same.

 

Democracy only works when people operate in good faith. 

 

You can't work nor can you find compromise with people who do not operate in good faith. The entire system doesn't work if there are people like that in the system.

 

 

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On 2019-09-04 at 10:39 PM, Teh_Diplomat said:

A referendum could (perhaps @Angelfish can correct me on this) be called, but no one is really proposing that due to the potential backlash from the Vote Leave constituents; and by that I mean there are individual members of parliament who would like another referendum (and they'll argue it for various reasons), but the opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn has stated he believes that their only move is a negotiated agreement with the EU for a Brexit. 

 

But a general election can either be called by the party in power, as with a referendum, but neither seem people since Boris seems to have pissed off enough people within his own party: by sacking of assistants, threats of expulsion from the party, and an overall sense that he really has no clue on how to proceed or even get to October 31st, the supposed Hard Brexit date.

 

Also, @Ike yes I believe the EU would need to offer the UK an extension to avoid crashing out completely on the current date.

Sorry for the late reply here (to say the least :killzone:).  Technically, I think its possible to have both a referendum and general election although it probably makes more sense to just have a general election with each of the parties deciding themselves in their general election manifesto's whether or not they support a referendum and if so, what the question is and what options are on the ballot.  Then people are free to vote for whichever party supports their position.  I say that because not everyone supports another referendum (and the parties know this as polling reflects this) and some regard it as a front to dilute or overturn the original referendum result through 'democratic' means if-you-like.  I could see Labour supporting a referendum in their general election pledge for example but not the Conservatives.  Another issue I suppose is getting the House of Commons to vote for either a referendum and / or a general election because the Conservatives have just lost 20 or so of their own MP's (losing their majority in the process) and so require support from both sides of the House to get either one or both through.  The opposition parties have recently blocked on two recent occasions attempts by the government to force a snap General Election.  They say because they don't trust Boris to deliver on his General Election date of mid-October and whether he will instead just call one after the 31st October when we've already left the EU.  The Government's response to that is that they believe the Opposition parties are scared of a general election since recent polling indicates that the Conservatives have a healthy lead over Labour.

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5 minutes ago, Angelfish said:

Sorry for the late reply here (to say the least :killzone:).  Technically, I think its possible to have both a referendum and general election although it probably makes more sense to just have a general election with each of the parties deciding themselves in their general election manifesto's whether or not they support a referendum and if so, what the question is and what options are on the ballot.  Then people are free to vote for whichever party supports their position.  I say that because not everyone supports another referendum (and the parties know this as polling reflects this) and some regard it as a front to dilute or overturn the original referendum result through 'democratic' means if-you-like.  I could see Labour supporting a referendum in their general election pledge for example but not the Conservatives.  Another issue I suppose is getting the House of Commons to vote for either a referendum and / or a general election because the Conservatives have just lost 20 or so of their own MP's (losing their majority in the process) and so require support from both sides of the House to get either one or both through.  The opposition parties have recently blocked on two recent occasions attempts by the government to force a snap General Election.  They say because they don't trust Boris to deliver on his General Election date of mid-October and whether he will instead just call one after the 31st October when we've already left the EU.  The Government's response to that is that they believe the Opposition parties are scared of a general election since recent polling indicates that the Conservatives have a healthy lead over Labour.

It's fucking baffling that the Labour party - given all the recent news, long delays and infighting/indecision from the Tories; that the Labour party seems unable to get a lead. to the point where the Lib-Dems have made somewhat of a comeback where a year ago they (Lib-Dems) were essentially irrelevant.

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41 minutes ago, Teh_Diplomat said:

It's fucking baffling that the Labour party - given all the recent news, long delays and infighting/indecision from the Tories; that the Labour party seems unable to get a lead. to the point where the Lib-Dems have made somewhat of a comeback where a year ago they (Lib-Dems) were essentially irrelevant.

Agreed.  The Lib Dems are a very real threat to Labour at the moment (and to a lesser extent the Conservatives with Conservative sitting MP's in Remain constituencies).  I think Labour know that regardless of what position they take, they will be losing votes either way.  Always at the back of their minds are the 5 million voters who voted for Corbyn in 2017 that voted for Brexit that are almost certainly located outside of London and metropolitan University 'Oxbridge' areas.  If Labour's official policy is to come out for Remain when all is said and done (which is possible given where the Labour party membership is), the narrative in the tabloids will almost certainly be that Labour are continuing to abandon their traditional white, working class base.

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